New Workers, Old Workers, Refresh your Knowledge on Workers Compensation (Part 2)

Continuing our discussion on the basics of worker’s compensation, let’s now get into a few details about the Colorado worker’s compensation program. There are terminologies that you need to be familiar about as they seem to be challenging to understand.

Below are some terms that you should know. Remember that being well-informed about the system can help you protect your rights.

 Medical benefits

All medical expenses incurred by an injured worker is covered by the worker’s compensation insurance or the employer. These include hospitalization, therapy, medical procedures, doctor’s appointments and other medical supplies needed by the injured worker.

 Temporary disability benefits

Also known as lost wage benefits. While seeking medical attention, you may not be able to return to work because of doctor’s restrictions. Thus, you are entitled to receive temporary disability benefits.

There are two types of this benefit:

  • Temporary total disability means an injured worker is fully restricted from working and will receive a pay 2/3 of the average weekly wage. This amount up to $800 per week and this limit may change every year.
  • Temporary partial disability means an injured worker can still perform limited roles at work most likely at a lower wage. You will then receive a pay 2/3 of the difference between your previous wage and your current reduced wage.

 

 

Permanent disability benefits

Can be classified into two: Permanent total disability and permanent partial disability. Permanent total disability means an injured worker is not able to return to any type of employment. In order to receive a permanent total disability benefit, an injured worker needs to be found totally unable to make any wages.

On the other hand, permanent partial disability means an injured worker has a permanent impairment that could be permanent to his life but still can perform a job and make wages. This is determined when you reach the maximum medical improvement (MMI) and your doctor assigns an impairment rating.

Your permanent partial disability benefit may vary depending on which part of your body is severely injured or non-functional. This could be best explained to you by an experienced Colorado workers compensation lawyer.

 

Monetary benefit for disfigurement

This is an amount given to an injured worker who suffers from disfigurement like scars that don’t fade away and atrophies. These disfigurements may affect your personal image in the workplace and your job performance as well.

 

Death and funeral benefits

If unfortunately a worker losses his life while on-their-job duty, their dependents are entitled to death benefits which pay 2/3 of the workers weekly wage. The surviving spouse will receive the death benefit for a lifetime or until he/she settles into another marriage. Children (including adoptions) will receive the death benefit until 18-21 years of age.

Meanwhile, other dependents like parents and siblings over 18/21, can receive the death benefits if they are proven dependent to the worker at the time of his death. More of that, funeral expenses are covered up to $7,000, and all other medical expenses by the workers compensation insurance or employer.

 

Worker’s compensation may sound complicated but it is a must that you understand the whole system for you to receive what you are due. Our attorneys at Kaplan Morrell will provide you more information. Call us at 866 356 9898 for a FREE CONSULTATION.